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The summary of the descriptive statistics is based on National Cancer Institute Lung and Bronchus Cancers which includes United State population

The summary of the descriptive statistics below is based on National Cancer Institute Lung and Bronchus Cancers which includes United State population such as American Indian/ Alaska Native ( Including Hispanic), Asia/ Pacific Islander ( Including Hispanic), Black ( Including Hispanic), Hispanic ( Any race), and White ( Hispanic). However, the year of diagnosis is from 2000 to 2015, and it measures in rate/ 100,000. Based on the total number of diagnosis of cancer among American population from the 2000 to the year 2015, Black ( Including Hispanic) has the highest number of cancer diagnosis, followed by white( including Hispanic), then followed by American Indian/ Alaska Native ( Including Hispanic). Asia/ Pacific Islander (Including Hispanic), and the Hispanic (Any race) have the lowest number of diagnosis.

For many years ago, lung and bronchus cancer has been the leading cause of cancer type among men, and women, and the survival rates are still low. Analysis of the National Cancer Institute data for Lung and Bronchus Cancer 2018 reveals disparities among American population. Calculation of the descriptive statistics reveals that among the American population, the Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian have a lower incidence of lung cancer compare to the Black and White populations. These same correlations can be seen in standard deviations reflecting elevated numbers for the Black and White populations. All five population categories have lung cancers over the last 15 years with a significant decrease in the American Indian/Alaskan Native, Black and White. Sample variance and the range for the American Indian/Alaskan Native, Black and White populations are elevated. The highest range is seen with population that has the highest diagnosis.

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The summary of the descriptive statistics below is based on National Cancer Institute Lung and Bronchus Cancers which includes United State population such as American Indian/ Alaska Native ( Including Hispanic), Asia/ Pacific Islander ( Including Hispanic), Black ( Including Hispanic), Hispanic ( Any race), and White ( Hispanic). However, the year of diagnosis is from 2000 to 2015, and it measures in rate/ 100,000. Based on the total number of diagnosis of cancer among American population from the 2000 to the year 2015, Black ( Including Hispanic) has the highest number of cancer diagnosis, followed by white( including Hispanic), then followed by American Indian/ Alaska Native ( Including Hispanic). Asia/ Pacific Islander (Including Hispanic), and the Hispanic (Any race) have the lowest number of diagnosis.

For many years ago, lung and bronchus cancer has been the leading cause of cancer type among men, and women, and the survival rates are still low. Analysis of the National Cancer Institute data for Lung and Bronchus Cancer 2018 reveals disparities among American population. Calculation of the descriptive statistics reveals that among the American population, the Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian have a lower incidence of lung cancer compare to the Black and White populations. These same correlations can be seen in standard deviations reflecting elevated numbers for the Black and White populations. All five population categories have lung cancers over the last 15 years with a significant decrease in the American Indian/Alaskan Native, Black and White. Sample variance and the range for the American Indian/Alaskan Native, Black and White populations are elevated. The highest range is seen with population that has the highest diagnosis.

The data shows generally, in a population of 100,000 people, average mean of Black descent from 2000 to 2015 are having cancer at a rate of 70 /100,000 people which suggests that the death rate for this group is higher than others. The same correlations can be seen in the sample variations of five population categories which show a decrease in the rate of incidence of Alaska Native, Black and White populations. Based on the five groups, Black (Including Hispanic) has the highest median while Hispanic (Any race) has the lowest median. Highest frequency of diagnosis is seen among the White (Including Hispanic), and the lowest is seen among the Hispanic (Any race) while American Indian/ Native Alaska (Including Hispanic) and Black (Including Hispanic) signified not applicable

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The summary of the descriptive statistics below is based on National Cancer Institute Lung and Bronchus Cancers which includes United State population such as American Indian/ Alaska Native ( Including Hispanic), Asia/ Pacific Islander ( Including Hispanic), Black ( Including Hispanic), Hispanic ( Any race), and White ( Hispanic). However, the year of diagnosis is from 2000 to 2015, and it measures in rate/ 100,000. Based on the total number of diagnosis of cancer among American population from the 2000 to the year 2015, Black ( Including Hispanic) has the highest number of cancer diagnosis, followed by white( including Hispanic), then followed by American Indian/ Alaska Native ( Including Hispanic). Asia/ Pacific Islander (Including Hispanic), and the Hispanic (Any race) have the lowest number of diagnosis.

For many years ago, lung and bronchus cancer has been the leading cause of cancer type among men, and women, and the survival rates are still low. Analysis of the National Cancer Institute data for Lung and Bronchus Cancer 2018 reveals disparities among American population. Calculation of the descriptive statistics reveals that among the American population, the Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian have a lower incidence of lung cancer compare to the Black and White populations. These same correlations can be seen in standard deviations reflecting elevated numbers for the Black and White populations. All five population categories have lung cancers over the last 15 years with a significant decrease in the American Indian/Alaskan Native, Black and White. Sample variance and the range for the American Indian/Alaskan Native, Black and White populations are elevated. The highest range is seen with population that has the highest diagnosis.